Entanglements

Browse Items (4 total)

  • MOHAI1983.10.1774.1.tif

    Exterior of the East Kong Yick Building around 1920. Business names include, from left to right, Quong Tuck Co., Wa Chong Co., Shing Chong & Co., and Yan Wo Co.
  • MOHAI1983.10.1774.1.tif

    Exterior of the East Kong Yick Building around 1920. Business names include, from left to right, Quong Tuck Co., Wa Chong Co., Shing Chong & Co., and Yan Wo Co.

    MOHAI caption:
    Starting in 1907, Asian immigrants began moving their businesses into the area around Seattle's King Street. Ethnic enclaves helped reinforce cultural and kinship ties, and provided a sense of security from an often hostile white majority. The Chinese didn't have much choice; restrictive covenants by real estate agents and homeowners prevented Chinese and other Asians from living elsewhere. The neighborhood grew into what is now known as the International District, and continues to be a cultural and commercial center for the city's diverse Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. This image was taken facing north east on S. King Street, between Seventh Avenue and Eighth Avenue. The building featured here, the East Kong Yick Building at 719 South King Street, was built in 1910 and since 2005 has been home to the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.
  • 5168891D-B35E-4C17-92CE-31340458533C.jpeg

    Interior of the Wa Chong Company Store. The shelves are full of imported goods such as porcelin dining sets and there are rugs hanging from the ceiling. A suited man stands in the center of the store, facing the camera, and another looks at the photographer from behind the counter.
  • 15 Wa Chong Store - Seattle Daily Times-Mar 6 1897.png

    Newspaper microfilm scan featuring an advertisement for the Wa Chong Company.
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